Retired UIndy Professor Provides ‘Foreword’ for New Book

NOTE: Dr. Charlotte Templin, a retired English professor and former department head at the University of Indianapolis, provided the “Foreword” for the new book titled Dialing in on DI-AL-Y-SIS authored by Indianapolis south side resident and retired journalist Bernie Gilmer. Dr. Templin’s contribution follows:

Foreword

The reader of Dialing in on DI-AL-Y-SIS, Bernie Gilmer’s account of the journey through kidney disease to the threshold of dialysis and beyond that momentous point of embarkation, provides inspiration and entertainment as well as an abundance of valuable information on all things pertaining to kidneys. As such, the book will be very useful to the individual facing dialysis, patients’ families, and all those who want to know more about the kidney, that “large ugly mystery,” as Joseph Heller terms it in his comic novel Catch-22. Gilmer follows the familiar suggestion about what to do with lemons, and what he serves up is refreshing in spite of the seriousness of the subject.

Maintaining a sense of humor is one thing that gets our sometimes “discombobulated” (to use his word) retired journalist through the difficult challenges that seem to pop up with all-too-frequent regularity. He tells us that his book project was therapeutic, and it can be said that the healing he experienced is an offering to the reader.

The book is many things: what could be called an adventure story; a dissertation on the kidney and the process of dialysis; a meditation that proceeds through free association and brings in moments in American history, sports lore, and episodes in the history of medicine (with a scary account of early insulin injections). In short, there is much that relieves the somber account of that “ugly mystery,” the kidney.

Gilmer’s tale begins with his somewhat belated discovery that he has diabetes and proceeds with a useful account that gives an insider’s perspective on that frightening and uncomfortable moment. It carries on through dramatic episodes that might be the basis of a made-for-television movie, including urgent ambulance rides from doctor’s office to hospital, family conclaves about a family patriarch experiencing extreme sweating and chills, and other crises more interesting to read about than to experience.

Most important is the valuable information interspersed throughout:  how the kidney does its work and how the dialyzer does its work, causes of kidney failure, everything you wanted to know about kidney transplants, as much as anyone could possibly want to know about frequent urination, and, importantly, diabetes and kidney disease in society today. The exhaustive list of early symptoms of diabetes would be useful in every doctor’s waiting room.

Finally, the book ends with a note of hope — for some patients, for future progress and for peace for everyone on this journey.

Charlotte Templin, Ph.D.

Professor Emerita, University of Indianapolis

SURPRISE! BOOK TO BE AVAILABLE SOONER THAN EXPECTED

A new book by Indianapolis author Bernie Gilmer – titled Dialing in on DI-AL-Y-SIS – will be available for public purchase nearly a month earlier than previously announced.

Look for this personal account of the author’s seven-month experience on dialysis as an end stage renal disease patient to arrive for distribution as early as the last week of October or the first week in November. Availability of the informative and revealing book originally was announced for a late November release.

The 16-chapter, 174-page documentation of the author’s more than a decade-long journey in reaching the final stage of kidney disease also addresses topical issues: such as pertaining to whether patients who quit dialysis or refuse treatment are committing suicide, or whether those who are entering dialysis consider the new lifestyle as an albatross or as a blessing.

One chapter contains the prospects for hope for those on dialysis and for those with kidney transplants. Another chapter chronicles athletes who have received kidney transplants, and who many are now advocates for bringing attention to kidney disease. And another chapter combines perhaps some humor with definite suffering during the author’s encounters with the side effect of one of his medications, an account that should not be told at the dinner table.

Initial book distribution will be handled by the DIO DI-AL-Y-SIS Company, owned and managed by the author, a Perry Township resident on the Indianapolis south  side. Promotion is being marketed online at www.diodialysis.com.

Author’s Second Oldest Son Contributes to Book

When Indianapolis author Bernie Gilmer needed professional input on two specific topics in his new book titled Dialing in on DI-AL-Y-SIS, he had only to turn to his second-oldest son, Archie Gilmer.

The popular topics related to whether going on dialysis is an albatross or a blessing, and whether quitting or refusing dialysis treatments is suicide. Archie is the minister/evangelist of the Williamston Church of Christ in North Carolina, and is also the town’s chaplain for both the police and fire departments. In addition, he is a volunteer policeman and when time allows a part-time online blogger.

His varied background following his teen years has enabled him to develop multiple experiences with people in all aspects of life over the past quarter of a century. At his father’s request, he responded by crafting a dissertation titled Dialysis and Faith that offered perspectives on the dialysis questions, with excerpts from his writing appearing in two different chapters of the book.

To peruse Archie’s entire dissertation, you are invited to visit his blog posting at: Dialysis and Faith

Book On Road to Dialysis to be Released in Late November

Indianapolis author Bernie Gilmer, a retired journalist and end stage renal disease patient, is offering his account of the road that led him to being placed on dialysis in February of 2017. Titled Dialing in on DI-AL-Y-SIS, the 174-page paperback is scheduled to be printed in late November.

The in-detail writing documents a journey that includes a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in late 2004, followed by two heart surgeries – one (heart stent) in 2009 and another (heart valve replacement) in early 2014 – and spending more than a decade on kidney disease watch. Along the way, he logged numerous episodes of fainting likely due to low blood sugar or to high levels of potassium.

The account specifically outlines how dialysis since the first treatment in the United States in 1945 has grown to a multi-billion-dollar industry, with more than 650,000 patients now on dialysis or having been recipients of kidney transplants. Passages detail how the process of dialysis works, and how patients respond to being an end stage renal disease statistic.

Gilmer portrays himself repeatedly as “this poor ol’ retired (mostly tired) journalist,” with most of his health concerns – eye implant surgeries, diabetes diagnosis, heart operations and kidney disease that has led to dialysis – all cropping up as he approached what is commonly referred to as the “Golden Years of Life.”

The book, a therapeutic effort for the author, is designed to be informative on the topic of dialysis, while at the same time being entertaining and revealing.

One chapter contains the prospects for hope for those on dialysis and for those with kidney transplants. Another chapter chronicles athletes who have received kidney implantations. And another chapter combines perhaps some humor with definite suffering during the author’s encounters with the side effect of one of his medications, an account that should not be told at the dinner table.

Also addressed are topical questions pertaining to whether dialysis is an albatross or a blessing, whether quitting or refusing dialysis is suicide, and whether Western Civilization’s attitude that treatment for end stage renal disease is limited to dialysis, and the only option for prolonging life other than kidney transplants, or are there other treatments in the world.

Initial book distribution will be handled by the DIO DI-AL-Y-SIS Company, managed by the author. Promotion is being marketed online at www.diodialysis.com.

As a journalist, Gilmer spent more than half a century in writing sports or promoting athletic events, and in newsroom management. His experiences included newspaper stops at Great Bend, Manhattan, Topeka and Parsons in Kansas and at Shelbyville, Fort Wayne and Indianapolis in Indiana, along with stints in Tennessee, North Carolina, Florida and Ohio. Also, he devoted three years at his alma mater, Kansas State University, as a sports publicist in the Athletic Department in the mid-1960s.

Gilmer’s family includes his wife, Maureen, along with eight children and nine grandchildren. While he is retired, his wife is a reporter and columnist for The Indianapolis Star.